Baskerville

Caslon and Baskerville

Caslon and Baskerville

John Baskerville’s intention was to improve William Caslon’s typeface. He wanted to make the type perfect and as readable as possible.

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Baskerville

comparison between fonts

comparison between fonts

Baskerville is considered a Transitional typeface because it has a vertical axis and more contrast between the thick and thin strokes compared to an Old Style font such as Garamond. The similarities between these two typefaces are that they both have thick and thin strokes. The differences are the serifs for Baskerville are thinner and more square. Another similar typeface to Baskerville is Times New Roman. The similarities between these two typefaces are that they both have thick strokes. The differences between these two are that the strokes for Times New Roman does not get very thin.

Baskerville

john baskerville

john baskerville

Baskerville is a transitional serif typeface designed in 1757 by John Baskerville (1706–1775) in Birmingham, England. John Baskerville created this typeface because he wanted to improve William Caslon typeface. John Baskerville changed the thick and thin storkes and he changed the rounded letters to more vertical letters.